The Suzuki Approach

What makes the Suzuki approach different?

Suzuki based his approach on the belief that “Musical ability is not an inborn talent but an ability which can be developed. Any child who is properly trained can develop musical ability, just as all children develop the ability to speak their mother tongue. The potential of every child is unlimited."

Thoughtful teachers have often used some of the elements listed here, but Suzuki has formulated them in a cohesive approach. Some basic differences are:

  • Suzuki teachers believe that musical ability can be developed in all children.

  • Students begin at young ages.

  • Parents play an active role in the learning process.

  • Children become comfortable with the instrument before learning to read music.

  • Technique is taught in the context of pieces rather than through dry technical exercises.

  • Pieces are refined through constant review.

  • Students perform frequently, individually and in groups.

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Does the Suzuki Method create prodigies?




Shinichi Suzuki, who noticed that all children acquire their native language naturally and fluently. He also made it clear that the goal of such musical education was to raise generations of children with "noble hearts", as opposed to creating famous musical prodigies. Musical ability is not an inborn talent but an ability which can be developed. Any child who is properly trained can develop musical ability, just as all children develop the ability to speak their mother tongue. The potential of every child is unlimited.

What is my role as the Suzuki parent?







As a Suzuki parent you will: